Categories:

Sign up for our newsletter to become part of the conversation:

** Please enter a valid email to join our community **

Thank you for joing the Mindset Works Community! Check your email for more information.

Transforming School from Performance to Learning

Transforming School from Performance to Learning

Most parents, teachers, and schools encourage students to perform as best as they can, but it turns out that a focus on performance can hinder learning, improvement, and, ironically, performance.

Continue reading
  22875 Hits
  0 Comments
22875 Hits
0 Comments

Talking To Students About Testing

Talking To Students About Testing

Share this with your students!

With high stakes testing, some students believe that the test tells them how smart they are. Students can come away from these tests thinking that they define them somehow - that the test tells them if they are a smart person or not.

Continue reading
  16745 Hits
  1 Comment
Recent comment in this post
Carla Silva
I use a PPP at the beginning of each semester to revise the steps they bare expected to follow ( before, while and after the test)... Read More
Tuesday, 05 May 2015 17:57
16745 Hits
1 Comment

Growth Mindset and Testing: What We Can Learn From The Hunger Games

Growth Mindset and Testing: What We Can Learn From The Hunger Games

This blog post was originally posted on Scholastic's Edublog on 3/20/2015. Republished with permission.

Learning vs. Performing

In The Hunger Games, at the Training Center before the "games" begin, Katniss Everdeen operates with a growth mindset. Her goal during those sessions is to improve, not to perform. She chooses stations where she can acquire new survival techniques, rather than stations where she can show off her advanced archery skills. Hence, other tributes observe her as a novice and they get the sense that she won't be a strong competitor. But she doesn't care. She knows that she can improve her survival skills (i.e. she has a growth mindset) and that doing so will help her.

But when the time comes for her private audition at the gym, Katniss' goals are different. They are not to learn, but to perform and show what she can do, so that the judges give her a high rating, which will help her gain sponsors. She initially misses the target, perhaps as a result of nervousness and lack of familiarity with the Capitol's bow, but she quickly adjusts her technique, calms herself down and delivers.

Continue reading
  13295 Hits
  0 Comments
Tags:
13295 Hits
0 Comments

Counted or Not, Doing What Counts

Counted or Not, Doing What Counts

"Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts." - William Bruce Cameron (and on a sign hanging in Albert Einstein's office)

"What is water?" said one fish to the other, illustrating that "the most obvious, important realities are often the ones that are hardest to see and talk about" (David Foster Wallace). One of these realities is that we teach competencies that can be easily tested and quantified rather than what is most important. This reality may seem obvious, but why do we keep doing it? If we strive to develop student agency, can we do a better job at taking agency ourselves for what we deem important?

Continue reading
  9752 Hits
  0 Comments
9752 Hits
0 Comments

A Work in Progress: Growth Minded Assessment

A Work in Progress: Growth Minded Assessment
Sam had a big smile on his face as he turned in his math test. Sam is in my Intermediate Algebra course, which is a developmental, prerequisite course for College Algebra. Students enroll in this course due to low SAT scores. Based on the big grin, I was optimistic about Sam's test.

"How'd you do?" I asked enthusiastically. "Well," he sighed, "I totally bombed it. But I feel really good about what I learned! Don't take it personally; this is the most I've ever understood in math."

After I graded it, I was devastated to see that he had scored a 30%. I thought about how I was going to have to give this test back to him. I thought about how I would try to soften the blow by telling him I was proud of his hard work, progress, and growth. I thought about the personalized feedback I would give him to help him learn from his mistakes. But mostly, I thought about how I felt like a hypocrite.

How could I develop and maintain Sam's growth mindset while simultaneously informing him that he is still failing in math?
Continue reading
  20943 Hits
  1 Comment
Recent comment in this post
Kevin Campbell
Great article
Thursday, 16 January 2014 16:41
20943 Hits
1 Comment